“She Can’t Help It”: Revisiting Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth

Photo Credit: Book cover for the Dover Thrift Edition of Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth, 2002, uploaded 6 July 2008 by Wolf Gang: Wolf Gang/Flickr/CC BY SA 2.0 "'Once—twice—you gave me the chance to escape from my life, and I refused it: refused it because I was a coward.'" (Lily Bart to Lawrence Selden, … Continue reading “She Can’t Help It”: Revisiting Edith Wharton’s The House of Mirth

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The First Female Mad Scientist – Malita in The Devil-Doll (1936)

***This post is part of the Movie Scientist Blogathon, hosted by Christina Wehner.***  ***Some spoilers*** “[The film] has, in the person of Malita, what… may be the silver screen’s very first female mad scientist.” (El Santo, par. 9) A few weeks ago, I participated in the Barrymore Trilogy Blogathon with this blog post. I focused … Continue reading The First Female Mad Scientist – Malita in The Devil-Doll (1936)

Too Smart For Her Own Good: Ingrid Bergman in Hedda Gabler (1962)

***This post is part of The 3rd Wonderful Ingrid Bergman Blogathon, hosted by Virginie Pronovost of The Wonderful World of Cinema. *** ***Some spoilers*** “[Hedda] can be witty and charming. She’s knowledgeable and smart – and that is the problem. Hedda Gabler is too smart for her own good.” (Silver Screenings, par. 3) I’ve been a classic film … Continue reading Too Smart For Her Own Good: Ingrid Bergman in Hedda Gabler (1962)

A Walking Personality: Greta Garbo in Grand Hotel (1932)

***This post is part of the En Point: The Ballet Blogathon, hosted by Christina Wehner. *** ***Some spoilers*** “Mr. Goulding's avowed intention in bringing [Grand Hotel] to the screen was to use the camera as a ‘walking personality,’ letting it follow the tangled destinies of the central characters of the Continental setting as an invisible … Continue reading A Walking Personality: Greta Garbo in Grand Hotel (1932)